Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 2

Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 2

This is an excerpt from the article, “CPSC Issues Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers For more info, please visit http://www.cspc.gov.

For safest operation, CPSC staff recommends that consumers follow these guidelines as they prepare to use a turkey fryer:

  • Make sure there is at least 2 feet of space between the liquid propane tank and fryer burner.
  • Place the liquid propane gas tank and fryer so that any wind blows the heat of the fryer away from the gas tank.
  • Center the pot over the burner on the cooker.
  • Completely thaw (USDA says 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds) and dry turkey before cooking. Partially frozen and/or wet turkeys can produce excessive hot oil splatter when added to the oil.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to determine the proper amount of oil to add. If those are not available:
    • Place turkey in pot
    • Fill with water until the turkey is covered by about 1/2 inch of water
    • Remove and dry turkey
    • Mark water level. Dump water, dry the pot, and fill with oil to the marked level.

Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 1

Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers Part 1

This is an excerpt from the article, “CPSC Issues Safety Tips for Turkey Fryers For more info, please visit http://www.cspc.gov.

CPSC Issues

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is issuing safety tips for preventing fires and burns when using turkey fryers. Since 1998, CPSC has reports of 75 incidents that involved fires, flames, or burns associated with turkey fryers. Twenty-eight of these incidents were reported for the year 2002. Here are some of the hazard scenarios:

  • House fires associated with turkey fryers leading to injuries and property damage.
  • Ignition of oil used with turkey fryers. This was often related to oil reaching excess temperatures or oil contacting the open flame of the fryer.
  • Splashing of hot oil causing burns.

The majority of reported incidents occurred while the oil was being heated, prior to adding the turkey. For this reason, it is very important consumers monitor the temperature of the oil closely. If any smoke at all is noticed coming from a heating pot of oil, the burner should be turned off immediately because the oil is overheated.

There is a risk of injury resulting from splashing due to the cooking of partially frozen meats. Thoroughly thaw and dry ALL meats before cooking in hot oil. One reported burn incident occurred when partially frozen chicken wings were added to hot oil in a turkey fryer.

CPSC staff is working with industry and voluntary standards organizations to improve the safety standard for turkey fryers.

CPSC staff recommends consumers who choose to fry turkeys follow the following safety guidelines:

  • Keep fryer in FULL VIEW while burner is on.
  • Place fryer in an open area AWAY from all walls, fences, or other structures.
  • Never use IN, ON, or UNDER a garage, breezeway, carport, porch, or any structure that can catch fire.
  • Raise and lower food SLOWLY to reduce splatter and avoid burns.
  • COVER bare skin when adding or removing food.
  • Check the oil temperature frequently.
  • If oil begins to smoke, immediately turn gas supply OFF.
  • If a fire occurs, immediately call 911. DO NOT attempt to extinguish fire with water.

Using Turkey Fryers Safely

Using Turkey Fryers Safely

Each year, Americans prepare a whopping 45 million turkeys for the traditional Thanksgiving Day feast. However, for those who decide to center their meal around a fried turkey, the potential hazards of cooking that dinner in the turkey fryer can be far worse than putting on a few extra pounds.

The above is the video, “Danger of Turkey Fryers.” For more information, pase visit www.ul.com.

turkey-fryer-safely-2014-11-17For safest operation, CPSC staff recommends that consumers follow these guidelines as they prepare to use a turkey fryer:

  • Make sure there is at least 2 feet of space between the liquid propane tank and fryer burner.
  • Place the liquid propane gas tank and fryer so that any wind blows the heat of the fryer away from the gas tank.
  • Center the pot over the burner on the cooker.
  • Completely thaw (USDA says 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds) and dry turkey before cooking. Partially frozen and/or wet turkeys can produce excessive hot oil splatter when added to the oil.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to determine the proper amount of oil to add. If those are not available:
    • Place turkey in pot
    • Fill with water until the turkey is covered by about 1/2 inch of water
    • Remove and dry turkey
    • Mark water level. Dump water, dry the pot, and fill with oil to the marked level.

What is business liability insurance?

What is business liability insurance?

Running a small business involves a significant investment. Business insurance protects your investment by minimizing financial risks associated with unexpected events such as a death of a partner, an injured employee, a lawsuit, or a natural disaster. Unless you are an employer, business insurance is generally not required by law, however, it is common practice to purchase enough insurance to cover your assets. If your business is an LLC or a corporation, your personal assets are protected from business liabilities; however, neither business structure is a substitute for liability insurance, which covers your business from losses.

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Your state government determines insurance requirements for businesses. Most states require businesses with employees to pay for workers’ compensation insurance, unemployment insurance, and state disability insurance. Your state may require insurance of specific business activities. For example, if you own a car or truck and use it for business purposes, you may be required to purchase commercial auto insurance. Finally, your financial lender or investors may require you to maintain life, business interruption, fire, flood or other types of insurance to protect their investments.

The above is an excerpt adapted from the article, “Business Insurance.” For more information, please visit www.sba.gov

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents – Am I Covered?

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents – Am I Covered?

This is an excerpt from the article “Car Insurance and Deer Accidents”. For more information, please visit www.about.com for more info.

Am I covered? Deer accidents are covered under the comprehensive coverage of your insurance policy. If you are unsure of your coverage, locate your declarations page to verify. A quick phone call to your agent or customer service representative can also clarify what coverage you have listed on your vehicle.

Sometimes after a deer accident, a tow may be required. If you have comprehensive coverage, the tow will automatically be covered as part of the claim. If you do not have comprehensive coverage, but have roadside assistance, your tow will be covered. No comprehensive coverage plus no roadside assistance, means you will be on your own for both the damage of your vehicle and the tow.

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents – Will It Affect My Insurance Rate?

16Mar / 2012

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents – Will It Affect My Insurance Rate?

This is an excerpt from the article “Car Insurance and Deer Accidents.” For more info, please visit www. about.com.

Will it affect my insurance rate? Unfortunately, a definite answer across the board of insurance carriers is not available. Insurance companies have varying rules on comprehensive claims. Many times, comprehensive claims do not affect your insurance rate, but it is something you will have to verify with your carrier.

Deer accidents are frequent in many areas of the U.S. Knowing how to react when you see a deer can minimize your injuries and insurance bills. Know what your coverage is before a claim arises. Understanding how much your deductibles are and when they apply will prevent a lot of hassle. Speak with your agent or customer service representative if you have any questions about your coverage.

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents

Car Insurance and Deer Accidents

The following is an excerpt taken from the article, “Car Insurance and Deer Accidents” For more information please visit carinsurance.about.com.

The number of lawsuits The number of deer related accidents spike every fall. Deer auto accident statistics are staggering. Deer have a mind of their own and react unexpectedly. The only thing you can control is your own reaction to seeing a deer in your path. Prepare yourself for a potential deer accident and learn the answers to common questions regarding your insurance.

deer_on_roadshutterstock_111051494Should I swerve to avoid hitting a deer? No! Never swerve to miss hitting a deer. A lot more damage and injury is at stake if you swerve to attempt avoiding impact with a deer. Once you swerve, you are at a much greater risk of hitting oncoming traffic, a tree, light post, mailbox, or ditch. The damage from hitting a deer is often minimal in comparison to hitting one of these other objects. Injury is also a lot more probable when you swerve to miss a deer.

The consequences for swerving to miss a deer can be significant in regards to your insurance policy too. Hitting an inanimate object with your vehicle is a collision. Collision accidents often come with higher deductibles and higher surcharges.

Swerving to miss a deer is a natural reaction. It takes focus to consider all the repercussions of swerving. A deer can cause major damage to your vehicle and cause injury, but the potential is much greater if you plow into a tree. Take your foot off the gas and keep a straight course to reduce damage and higher insurance rates.

Am I covered? Deer accidents are covered under the comprehensive coverage of your insurance policy. If you are unsure of your coverage, locate your declarations page to verify. A quick phone call to your agent or customer service representative can also clarify what coverage you have listed on your vehicle.

Sometimes after a deer accident, a tow may be required. If you have comprehensive coverage, the tow will automatically be covered as part of the claim. If you do not have comprehensive coverage, but have roadside assistance, your tow will be covered. No comprehensive coverage plus no roadside assistance, means you will be on your own for both the damage of your vehicle and the tow.

Do I have a deductible? Comprehensive coverage is often purchased with a deductible. Some companies do offer a zero deductible, so it depends on how you set your policy up. Comprehensive is less expensive than collision and is often sold with a lower deductible. If you have a deductible listed on comprehensive, it will definitely apply to a deer auto accident. Check your declarations page or call your agent to verify what your deductible is listed at.

Do I need a police report? Police reports are handy with any insurance claim; however, usually they are not required for a comprehensive claim to be paid out. It is recommended to get a police report especially if you have hit multiple deer recently. Documentation makes the claim process cut and dry. If you are able to get a report filed with the police department, get it done.

Will it affect my insurance rate? Unfortunately, a definite answer across the board of insurance carriers is not available. Insurance companies have varying rules on comprehensive claims. Many times, comprehensive claims do not affect your insurance rate, but it is something you will have to verify with your carrier.

Deer accidents are frequent in many areas of the U.S. Knowing how to react when you see a deer can minimize your injuries and insurance bills. Know what your coverage is before a claim arises. Understanding how much your deductibles are and when they apply will prevent a lot of hassle. Speak with your agent or customer service representative if you have any questions about your coverage.

Teen Driving Safety: Graduated Driver Licensing Saves Lives

Teen Driving Safety: Graduated Driver Licensing Saves Lives

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GDL is a novice driver licensing system that is proven effective at reducing teen drivers’ high crash risk by 20-40%. States with stronger, comprehensive GDL systems see a higher reduction in teen crashes. GDL reduces teen driver exposure to high crash risk situations, such as nighttime driving and teen passengers. This allows new drivers to build experience and skills in lower-risk conditions.

Graduated Driver Licensing: A Proven Road to Improved Teen Safety

The National Safety Council is a leader in promoting Graduated Driver Licensing [visit to review and download helpful pdf:  nsc.org] (GDL).